Prayer is Foundational to the Christian

Prayer is absolutely foundational to anything we wish to do as a church.

Our sermon yesterday took the title: “Your prayer life – a Force or Farce?” (You can hear this sermon later this week on our church app.)

In thinking about the discipline of prayer, Donald Bloesch in his book The Struggle of Prayer writes: “The Bible does not prescribe the time or length of prayer, but it does offer guidelines. In Psalm 88 prayer is offered in the early morning (v.13), and in Psalm 55 prayers are said evening, morning and at noon (v.17).

Daniel knelt for devotions three times a day (Daniel 6:10). Jesus prayed before sunrise, (Mark 1:35), and in the evening when the day’s work was over (Mark 6:46). Peter prayed at the third, sixth and ninth hours.

Just as the Christian is not bound to ritual laws that regulate the preparation for prayer, so we are not absolutely bound to set times of prayer. Yet, there are times that are more appropriate for prayer than others: the gathering together for worship, the hours before work and bedtime, the time right before meals, when we need to remind ourselves of the goodness of God. But a Christian should feel free to pray anywhere, anytime, in the midst of daily work and play as well as in the solitude of their room in the early morning or late in the evening.”

Benediction:

May the Almighty and ever-present God Guide, direct and enable your life and witness in this new week before us. Amen.

˄GS

Reminder: all sermons are uploaded to our church app around the middle of each week. The app is completely free.

PASTORAL CARE:

For urgent Pastoral Care matters, prayer requests, and other urgent concerns, please contact one of the following:

  • Pastor Grant Spangenberg: 8532 2883 or 0419 848 336
  • Elder Trevor Hampel: 8532 3701 or 0408 839 381 (or use the Contact form above)
  • Elder Ted Smith: 0438 850 270

    Pray Morning, Noon and in the Evening. (Photo T. Hampel)

    Pray Morning, Noon and in the Evening.                                    (Photo T. Hampel)